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View Full Version : set up a local GE server..?



jochri
07-23-2005, 10:18 AM
just a thought:

Is it possible to mirror a complete GE server on a local machine and run GE completly without an Internet connection? i would love to have the whole earth in high res on my local machine...

...what do you think...or maybe google will offer an DVD with an standalone GE version?

Steeefan
07-23-2005, 11:07 AM
i don't think that this is possible and it also would be way too much data i think
i also don't think that there will be a GE-DVD

jochri
07-23-2005, 12:03 PM
i don't think that this is possible and it also would be way too much data i think..

how much? 100gb more / less?

felipeboralli
07-23-2005, 02:24 PM
how much? 100gb more / less?

from http://earth.google.com/earth.html

"Imagery and 3D data depict the entire earth - Terabytes of aerial and satellite imagery depict cities around the world in high-resolution detail."

Well, a Terabyte is 1024 GB, so you can have an idea of how huge the database will be. From what they say, i guess is about 10 TB, or 10240 GB.

Appletom
07-23-2005, 02:43 PM
From aecnews.com (http://aecnews.com/articles/1050.aspx):

In May 2005 Keyhole/Google released a new Primary Database, calling it “the largest scale, highest resolution, natural color database of the earth's visual appearance and terrain shape ever assembled.” The new database is approximately 60 terabytes

So - 60 terabytes x 1,024 gigabytes = 61,440 gigs.

The largest hard drive I could find at Newegg.com is 400 gigs and costs $235.00.

It would take 154 of these hard drives to hold the entire GEarth database. So for only $36,190 (plus shipping) you too can have the entire GEarth database - if Google would let you.

jochri
07-23-2005, 04:06 PM
it can't be that bad, they sell it:
http://earth.google.com/earth_server.html

hypeserver
07-23-2005, 05:10 PM
I'm so setting that up lol. requires 1 gb memory which means these are probaly compressed files that have probaly been compresssed so many times its not funny.

jochri
07-24-2005, 07:39 AM
I'm so setting that up lol. requires 1 gb memory which means these are probaly compressed files that have probaly been compresssed so many times its not funny.

well, you can compress images from raw to bmp to jpg to jpg 2000 from high to low quality, you can still use any rar tar and zip compression but it won't make it hardly any smaller than jpg, you can't really compress jpg any further....jpg is the end of the line

PenguinOpus
07-24-2005, 07:41 PM
The enterprise version of Google Earth Fusion and Google Earth client (EC) allow you to create and host your own database. Pricing limits this to reasonably large corporations. In all current users, they are hosting their own, smaller, datasets. No one has a copy of the current Google Earth database... too large.

Architect
12-08-2010, 08:22 PM
I know this thread has not been in circulation for a while but has anyone found a solution to this? it says 60terabytes and now that is not so unobtainable. 2 terabyte drives can be had meaning only 30 drives would be needed. I am sure the data has increased too but by how much? maybe 90 tb?

Forkboy2
12-08-2010, 10:02 PM
There is no way to do this. Google would never allow it. The imagery is worth millions of dollars. They would never just give it all away for free.

Architect
12-09-2010, 12:39 PM
well there is software to automate scanning the surface of the globe while you cache the images. but the thing is I thought they were pulling these images from other sources. I mean does google have their own array of satellites (and by that I mean it would take like 300 or more satellites to properly cover the entire planet) I do not think so. basically I am guessing to do this would be to require their sources they pull from and software to place it properly on the globe.

though if any of this is wrong please let me know.

also I would like to know if anyone has a way to calculate distances between points of the globe *(direct distance not along the curvature of the earth) I know it would take an accurate globe shape with the proper ovoid shape and the exact mean of what sea level is as well as how far above or below this the two locations are. I know this sounds silly but it does have a very real use for me.

Forkboy2
12-10-2010, 12:50 AM
Yes, you can cache tiles for offline use. But you're limited to the size of your cache, and then next time you go online, it starts getting replaced by new tiles.

Google licenses most of the imagery from commercial providers. I believe some is also public domain (USGS, etc.). Their license agreements with the owners of the imagery don't allow them to give it away.