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Thread: This Day in History

  1. #271
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    Default 10.07.1976: The Seveso disaster in Italy

    The Seveso disaster was an industrial accident that occurred around 12:37 pm July 10, 1976, in a small chemical manufacturing plant approximately 25 km north of Milan in the Lombardy region in Italy. It resulted in the highest known exposure to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) in residential populations which gave rise to numerous scientific studies and standardized industrial safety regulations. The EU industrial safety regulations are known as the Seveso II Directive.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seveso_disaster
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  2. #272
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    Default Oct. 30.1938: Orson Welles radioplay War of the worlds

    The War of the Worlds was an episode of the American radio drama anthology series Mercury Theatre on the Air. It was performed as a Halloween episode of the series on October 30, 1938 and aired over the Columbia Broadcasting System radio network. Directed and narrated by Orson Welles, the episode was an adaptation of H. G. Wells' novel The War of the Worlds.

    The first two thirds of the 60-minute broadcast was presented as a series of simulated news bulletins, which suggested to many listeners that an actual Martian invasion was in progress. Compounding the issue was the fact that the Mercury Theatre on the Air was a 'sustaining show' (i.e., it ran without commercial breaks), thus adding to the dramatic effect. Although there were sensationalist accounts in the press about a supposed panic, careful research has shown that while thousands were frightened, there is no evidence that people fled their homes or otherwise took action. The news-bulletin format was decried as cruelly deceptive by some newspapers and public figures, leading to an outcry against the perpetrators of the broadcast, but the episode launched Welles to fame.

    Welles's adaptation was one of the Radio Project's first studies.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_War..._Worlds_(radio)

    Part 1: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4wf5TPVz56A

    Part 2: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QUBisKB5l98

    Part 3: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ejt_aWUrEp8

    Part 4: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2aYZPkHEp_s

    Part 5: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_wxLjcz1oE8

    Part 6: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4fFLmXZ9Lmk

    Part 7: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QuDdAe17OL0

  3. #273
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    Default January 30th. 1959: The danish TITANIC (MS Hans Hedtoft) sank

    MS Hans Hedtoft was a Danish liner that struck an iceberg and sank on 30 January 1959 on her maiden voyage.

    Hans Hedtoft was built at Frederikshavn. She had a double bottom and seven watertight compartments and an armoured bow and stern. She was designed to provide a year-round service between Denmark and Greenland. Like the Titanic, Hans Hedtoft had a riveted hull, a feature which was criticised by Knud Lauritzen, a shipowner. Lauritzen claimed that a riveted hull was not as resistant to ice pressure as a welded hull. Hans Hedtoft had the Code Letters and radio callsign OXKA.

    Hans Hedtoft sailed from Copenhagen on her maiden voyage on 7 January 1959. Her voyage to Julianehaab, Greenland, was made in record time. Hans Hedtoft called at Nuuk, Sisimiut and Maniitsoq before returning to Julianehaab.

    On 29 January, she began her return journey. The ship had 40 crew, 55 passengers and a cargo of frozen fish on board. One of her passengers was the Danish parliament (Folketing) member Augo Lynge. The next day, Hans Hedtoft collided with an iceberg about 35 miles (56 km) south of Cape Farewell. A distress call was given at 13:56 (local time) stating that the ship had hit an iceberg at 59°30′N 43°00′W / 59.5, -43. The call was answered by the USCGC Campbell, the West German trawler Johannes Krüss of Bremerhaven and another West German trawler. Within an hour, another message was sent stating that the engine room was flooded. At 15:12, it was announced that the ship was sinking. A final message was sent at 17:41 stating the ship was slowly sinking and requesting immediate assistance. Aircraft in Newfoundland were grounded by the weather and unable to assist in the search for Hans Hedtoft. The beginning of a SOS was received by Johnannes Krüss at 17:41 after which communication with Hans Hedtoft was lost. On 31 January, USCGC Campbell reported that conditions were the worst seen and there was no sign of Hans Hedtoft. The search was called off on 7 February. The only piece of wreckage ever recovered was a lifebelt which washed ashore some nine months after the ship sank. As a result of the sinking, the airfield at Narsarsuaq, Greenland, which had closed in November 1958, was reopened.

    Like the Titanic, Hans Hedtoft was said to be the safest ship afloat, being described as "unsinkable" by some.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MS_Hans_Hedtoft
    http://www.hanshedtoft.dk/index.htm

    The lifebelt from MS Hans Hedtoft at the church of Qaqortoq (Julianehaab)
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  4. #274
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    Default August 10. 1510: Royal Danish Navy was founded.

    The Royal Danish Navy (RDN) (officially Kongelige Danske Marine in Danish but generally known as Sĝvĉrnet or 'Sea Defence') is the sea-based branch of the Danish Defence force. The RDN is mainly responsible for maritime defence and maintaining the sovereignty of Danish, Greenlandic and Faroese territorial waters. Other tasks include surveillance, search and rescue, icebreaking, oil spill recovery and prevention as well as contributions to international tasks and forces.

    During the period 1509-1814 when Denmark was in union with Norway, the Danish Navy was part of the Royal Dano-Norwegian Navy. Despite the country's relatively small size, the navy is now equipped with a number of large state-of-the-art vessels commissioned since the end of the Cold War. This can be explained by its strategic location as the NATO member controlling access to the Baltic.

    Danish Navy ships carry the prefix KDM (Kongelige Danske Marine) in Danish, but this is translated to HDMS (Her / His Danish Majesty's Ship) in English. Denmark is one of several NATO member states whose navies do not deploy submarines.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Royal_Danish_Navy

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