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Thread: This Day in History

  1. #256
    Moderator Emeritus Appletom's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Captain Hornblower View Post
    26.06.1948 - Berlin airlift began
    You know Captain, I guess I wasn't paying attention in history class, because even though I've heard the phrases "Berlin Blockade" and "Berlin Airlift", I had no clue as to what happened and why.

    Until today.

    Thanks for posting. I find it fascinating and highly recommend reading the entire Wikipedia article - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Berlin_...Berlin_Airlift
    Last edited by Appletom; 06-26-2008 at 09:15 PM.

  2. #257
    Super Moderator Captain Hornblower's Avatar
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    Apart from the political consequences, this was an giant afford to keep such a big city like half Berlin alive for 15 month - just from air. Imagine, just three years ago Germans and Allies were enemies, tried to kill each other. And then, those guys risked their lifes to save the former enemies lifes - also to keep a little spot in the world free of another dictator.

    Those kids who waited for some candy dropped by pilots are now our parents or grandparents. In Berlin the spirit of the airlift is still present. And some of us descandants can assume what went on that days and keep that in mind.

    http://www.germany.info/relaunch/pol...jens2002a.html
    http://urbanlegends.about.com/library/bl-luetjens.htm
    http://www.marine.de/portal/a/marine...%2Fcontent.jsp
    http://www.andrewcusack.com/blog/200...and_by_you.php

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    Post 26.6.1847: Second railway-line in Denmark opened.

    King Christian VIII opened the second railway-line in Denmark between Copenhagen and Roskilde. It took 40 minutes for the trip.

    To the opening the danish composer Hans Christian Lumbye, Conductor in Tivoli Amusementpark, composed the Copenhagen Raailway Gallopp:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bv2Y9iZTCBI
    (Lean back, close your eyes and you can see the ride for you)

    The first opened on september 16th. 1844, on King Christian VIII birthday, between Hamburg-Altona and Lübeck. Altona and Lübeck was danish untill the danish defeat of the second Schleswig war.

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    Last edited by sladys; 06-26-2008 at 10:58 PM. Reason: additions

  4. #259
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    Quote Originally Posted by Appletom View Post
    You know Captain, I guess I wasn't paying attention in history class, because even though I've heard the phrases "Berlin Blockade" and "Berlin Airlift", I had no clue as to what happened and why.

    Until today.

    Thanks for posting. I find it fascinating and highly recommend reading the entire Wikipedia article - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Berlin_...Berlin_Airlift
    Here are more about the Berlin Blockade on YouTube:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zgqS9nfo0L8

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    Smile 100 years ago tomorrow...

    ...on June 30, 1908 the earth was impacted by something from space, most likely a fragment of a comet. It struck in the Siberian wilderness. Had it hit a populated area it would no doubt have been the most horrific natural disaster of all time.

    You can still see the impact crater, and if you turn on Panoramio you can see some interesting photos of the area. I'd love to visit it someday, but it's so remote that few people have ever seen it.

    I just thought I'd mention it, considering the 100th anniversary is coming up tomorrow.
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    Default 29 June, 2005 - GEH Begins

    Yep - it was three years ago today when Mickey made the first post on this forum.

    http://www.gearthhacks.com/forums/sh....php?p=1#post1

    Congratulations Mickey! And thanks for three wonderful years. Here's to many more.

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    Default Ich bin ein Berliner

    The history part is true enough, Captain Hornblower, but there's an amusing linguistic detail missing from this thread. Jack Kennedy was not fluent in German (as evidenced by the story). If the facts of the story are true, that he asked his interpreter to translate the line (and I have no reason to dispute your report), then Mr. Lochner was also less than totally fluent in German because in normal speech, Germans do not use the article in front of the place name noun. A native speaker of German would have said "Ich bin Berliner."

    By contrast, you or I might say "I am American" or "I am an American," but the German does not use the article.

    But there is another meaning to the word Berliner that has nothing to do with a person. It refers to a type of pastry, and if one wants to order one, one would say "Ein Berliner, bitte." So in effect, what Jack Kennedy actually said was "I am a jelly donut."

    The whole world, of course, understood what he was attempting to say, but those of us who are language purists get a kick out of his unintended faux pas.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Smoldering Ember View Post
    But there is another meaning to the word Berliner that has nothing to do with a person. It refers to a type of pastry, and if one wants to order one, one would say "Ein Berliner, bitte." So in effect, what Jack Kennedy actually said was "I am a jelly donut."

    The whole world, of course, understood what he was attempting to say, but those of us who are language purists get a kick out of his unintended faux pas.
    Of cause the Captain knows that, he is german.

    And you could read all what you wrote in your post in the Wikipedia article.

    Anyway, welcome to GEH.

  9. #264
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    Please read this about the "jelly doughnut legend":

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ich_bin...t_urban_legend

    or basically:

    In fact, the opposite is true: The citizens of Berlin do refer to themselves as Berliner; what they do not refer to as Berliner are jelly doughnuts. While these are known as "Berliner" in other areas of Germany, they are simply called Pfannkuchen (pancakes) in and around Berlin. Thus the merely theoretical ambiguity went unnoticed by Kennedy's audience, as it did in Germany at large. In sum, "Ich bin ein Berliner" was the appropriate way to express in German what Kennedy meant to say.

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    Smile 03.07.1848: Slaves freed on danish Virgin Islands, today US V.I.

    The danish Governor Peter von Scholten freed slaves on the danish Virgin Islands (danish Vest Indies).

    Peter von Scholten:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peter_von_Scholten

    Danish Vest Indies:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Danish_West_Indies

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    Post 3.7.1863: Battle of Gettysburg

    The Battle of Gettysburg (July 1 ľ July 3, 1863), fought in, and around the town of Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, as part of the Gettysburg Campaign, was the battle with the largest number of casualties in the American Civil War[3] and is frequently cited as the war's turning point.[4] Union Maj. Gen. George Gordon Meade's Army of the Potomac defeated attacks by Confederate General Robert E. Lee's Army of Northern Virginia, ending Lee's invasion of the North.

    Following his success at Chancellorsville in May 1863, Lee led his army through the Shenandoah Valley for his second invasion of the North, hoping to reach as far as Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, or even Philadelphia, and to influence Northern politicians to give up their prosecution of the war. Prodded by President Abraham Lincoln, Maj. Gen. Joseph Hooker moved his army in pursuit, but was relieved just three days before the battle and replaced by Meade.

    The two armies began to collide at Gettysburg on July 1, 1863, as Lee urgently concentrated his forces there. Low ridges to the northwest of town were defended initially by a Union cavalry division, which was soon reinforced with two corps of Union infantry. However, two large Confederate corps assaulted them from the northwest and north, collapsing the hastily developed Union lines, sending the defenders retreating through the streets of town to the hills just to the south.

    On the second day of battle, most of both armies had assembled. The Union line was laid out in a defensive formation resembling a fishhook. Lee launched a heavy assault on the Union left flank, and fierce fighting raged at Little Round Top, the Wheatfield, Devil's Den, and the Peach Orchard. On the Union right, demonstrations escalated into full-scale assaults on Culp's Hill and Cemetery Hill. Across the battlefield, despite significant losses, the Union defenders held their lines.

    On the third day of battle, July 3, fighting resumed on Culp's Hill, and cavalry battles raged to the east and south, but the main event was a dramatic infantry assault by 12,500 Confederates against the center of the Union line on Cemetery Ridge. Pickett's Charge was repulsed by Union rifle and artillery fire at great losses to the Confederate army. Lee led his army on a torturous retreat back to Virginia. Between 46,000 and 51,000 Americans were casualties in the three-day battle. That November, President Lincoln used the dedication ceremony for the Gettysburg National Cemetery to honor the fallen and redefine the purpose of the war in his historic Gettysburg Address.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Gettysburg

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    Post 08.07.1776: The Declaration of Independence was read aloud in Philadelphia

    The United States Declaration of Independence was a statement adopted by the Continental Congress on July 4, 1776, announcing that the thirteen American colonies then at war with Great Britain were no longer a part of the British Empire. Written primarily by Thomas Jefferson, the Declaration was a document formally explaining why Congress had voted on July 2 to declare independence from Great Britain, more than a year after the outbreak of the American Revolutionary War. The birthday of the United States of AmericaŚIndependence DayŚis celebrated on July 4, the day the wording of the Declaration was approved by Congress.

    Contrary to a widely held belief, Congress did not sign the Declaration of Independence on July 4, 1776. The Declaration was first published as a typeset broadside; the famous handwritten version was created after July 19, and was signed by most Congressional delegates on August 2. This copy, usually regarded as the Declaration of Independence, is now on display at the National Archives in Washington, D.C.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Declara...ited_States%29

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    Post 08.07.1947: Roswell UFO Incident publiced

    The Roswell Incident involved the recovery of materials near Roswell, New Mexico, USA, on July 7, 1947, which has become the subject of intense speculation, rumor and questioning. There are widely divergent views on what actually happened and passionate debate about what evidence can be believed. The United States military maintains that what was recovered was a top-secret research balloon that had crashed. Many UFO proponents believe the wreckage was of a crashed alien craft and that the military covered up the craft's recovery. The incident has turned into a widely-recognized and referred to pop culture phenomenon, and for some, Roswell is synonymous with UFOs. It ranks as one of the most publicized alleged UFO incidents.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roswell_UFO_incident

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    Post 10.07.1958: Alaska, highest tsunami wave ever recorded at Lituya Bay, at 524 m high.

    An earthquake caused a landslide in Crillon Inlet at the head of the bay on July 9, 1958, generating a massive mega-tsunami measuring 524 meters (~1,720 ft.) high. For comparison, the Empire State Building is 1,472 (448m) feet high including its antenna spire. The wave stripped trees and soil from the opposite headland and consumed the entire bay. There were three fishing boats anchored near the entrance of Lituya Bay on the day the giant waves occurred. One boat was sunk and the two people on board lost their lives. The other two boats were able to ride the waves. Among the survivors were William A. Swanson, and Howard G. Ulrich, who provided accounts of what they observed. By the time the wave reached the open sea, however, it dissipated quickly. This incident was the first direct evidence and eyewitness report of the existence of mega-tsunamis as a true natural disaster.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lituya_Bay

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    Post 10.07.1962: Telstar, the world's first communications satellite, is launched into orb

    Telstar was the first active communications satellite (launched in 1962), and the first satellite designed to transmit telephone and high-speed data communications. Its name is used to this day for a number of television broadcasting satellites.

    According to the US Space Objects Registry, Telstar 1 was still in orbit as of March 2008.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Telstar

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