Results 1 to 6 of 6

Thread: Red Numbers discussion

  1. #1
    Administrator GEHFileBot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    3,954

    Default Red Numbers discussion

    This is a discussion thread for the following file:

    Red Numbers

    Red Numbers throughout the rooftops in Los Angeles. There are so incredibly many of them. Most of them are 10's, followed by 12's. There is one 9.5 which is really weird. If I missed any, which I probably did, tell me or add a comment. Considering the vast number of heliports around these spots, and because they are all on roofs, I'm guessing these numbers have sumthing to do with helicopters.



    Warning: 62 placemarks.


  2. #2
    ṨῤἵḋểṙẊƻƻ SpiderX22's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Massachusetts
    Posts
    3,914

    Default ...

    If you find any more, or if you know what they represent, post them here.
    ٩(̾●̮̮̃̾Ľ̃̾)۶

  3. #3
    Master Finder McMaster_de's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Munich, Germany
    Posts
    1,268

    Default

    Yesterday I search a lot, but couldn't find out many.

    The only thing is, that these numbers are for the fire department when a fire strucks the building and that every building with more then 10 floors should have a helipad.
    Here are some skyscrapers with the number of their helipad:

    http://skyscraperpage.com/cities/?buildingID=1054
    http://skyscraperpage.com/cities/?buildingID=1300

    Their should be more on this side.

    Here is a photo from one roof:
    You search it, I will find it!

  4. #4
    Master Finder McMaster_de's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Munich, Germany
    Posts
    1,268

    Default

    You should sleep a night and go on and you will find what you search:



    LOS ANGELES MUNICIPAL CODE

    CHAPTER V PUBLIC SAFETY AND PROTECTION

    SEC. 57.118.12. EMERGENCY HELICOPTER LANDING FACILITY.

    Each building shall have a rooftop emergency helicopter landing facility in a location approved by the Chief. A heliport as classified in L.A.F.D. Standard No. 54 may be accepted in lieu of the emergency helicopter landing facility. Facilities shall be installed under Permit of Chapter 9 of the L.A.M.C. (Building and Plumbing Code) and should also be in accordance with the guidelines of L.A.F.D. Standard No. 54.

    A. Definitions:

    Approach-Departure Path - The flight path of the helicopter as it approaches or departs from the emergency helicopter landing facility designated take off and landing area. The approach-departure path is measured from the edge of the takeoff and landing area and is a rising slope determined by a ratio of eight feet horizontal distance for every one foot of vertical height.

    Peripheral Area - An obstruction free (i.e. no intrusions into the approach-departure path) area adjacent to the takeoff and landing area serving as a safety zone.

    Takeoff and Landing Area - The designated area on the emergency helicopter landing facility from which helicopter departures and approaches are intended to originate or terminate.

    Touchdown Pad - The load bearing portion of the emergency helicopter landing facility designated takeoff and landing area on which a helicopter may land.

    B. An emergency helicopter landing facility shall meet the following minimum requirements:

    1. Approach-Departure Path: The facility shall have two approach-departure paths with a 90 degree arc of separation between the two.

    2. Touchdown Pad: The touchdown pad shall have a dimension of 50 feet by 50 feet.

    NOTE: The touchdown pad is the same size as the takeoff and landing area.

    3. Peripheral Area: The peripheral area (obstruction free safety zone) surrounding the takeoff and landing area/touchdown pad shall be 25 feet from the edge of the takeoff and landing area.

    4. Safety Net: If the touchdown pad is elevated more than 30 inches above the adjoining roof level, a horizontally attached safety net shall be installed around the perimeter. The safety net shall be located in such a manner that it will not penetrate the approach-departure paths.

    5. A wind-indicating device shall be provided.

    6. Fire Protection: One Class H standpipe in accordance with Chapter 9 of the L.A.M.C. (Plumbing Code) shall be provided. A weather resistant cabinet for fire hose shall be provided with 100 feet of rubber-lined, single-jacketed, one and one-half inch fire hose equipped with a fog nozzle.

    7. The emergency helicopter landing facility shall be marked as indicated in Figure 118-A.

    EXCEPTION:

    Heliport marking as defined in L.A.F.D. Standard No. 54 for private use or public use may be accepted.

    FIGURE 118-A

    MARKINGS UTILIZING A SQUARE FOR A ROOF-TOP EMERGENCY HELICOPTER LANDING FACILITY.





    (Amendedby Ord. No. 167,326, Eff. 11/16/91.)

    (See also page C5-543 in the printed version of this Code.)

    NOTES:

    1. The preferred touchdown pad background color is white.

    2. The red numeral indicates the allowable weight, in thousands of pounds, that the facility is capable of supporting.

    3. The numeral shall be oriented toward magnetic north.

    4. Allowable weight shall not be in metric units.
    You search it, I will find it!

  5. #5
    Junior Member Eneas's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Mexico City
    Posts
    5

    Default Duude

    Duuude you're good!
    Lots of time in your hands I must say.... still, great job!
    Carpe Diem. Memento Mori

  6. #6
    ṨῤἵḋểṙẊƻƻ SpiderX22's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Massachusetts
    Posts
    3,914

    Default Thanks

    "The red numeral indicates the allowable weight, in thousands of pounds, that the facility is capable of supporting."

    Thanks. That also explains the 9.5 (9500 pounds).
    ٩(̾●̮̮̃̾Ľ̃̾)۶

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •