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Thread: Blue Roof's Beijing China

  1. #1
    Junior Member dbaseii's Avatar
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    Default Blue Roof's Beijing China

    If you look at Beijing in China you will notice that many roofs are painted blue.
    Does anyone know the reason for this

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    Senior Member Tom Baldwin's Avatar
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    Like these, for example?
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    Junior Member dbaseii's Avatar
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    exactly,
    At first thought you may think they are military buildings but if you look around you see them in populated districts

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    Member abkebab's Avatar
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    In Japan the like blue rooftops also look at the attachment

    Maybe the collor blue is a lukky color for the asian people
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    Camels are Ships of the desert

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    Senior Member stefankarakashev's Avatar
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    Whenever I travel through the countryside of Korea, I see a lot of orange and blue roofs. Sometimes it seems an entire village agreed to have only orange roofs. Is there a special meaning or reason why these colors are chosen? - Keith Hersch

    As part of an effort to modernize Korea, the late President Park Chung Hee enforced the so-called "New Village Movement" (Saemaeul Undong in Korean) in the 1970s, aimed at developing agricultural villages. In 1971, 335 sacks of cement were offered to 33,267 rural towns, and used for transforming the tradition-bound straw-thatched houses [choga-jip] into roofing tiles. So the tile roofs of the most houses were produced during the nearly same period. Thus we can guess that "entire villages came to have new roofs" with certain designated and stereotyped colors. When it comes to colors, we have to take into account the Korean people's color sense in architecture. On the basis of theory of five elements [o-haeng]and yin and yang as well as the traditional Korean colors of obang-saek (five colors of red, blue, yellow, white and black) has been widely used and among those, red and blue have been the main colors. (Think of Korean temples decorated with splendid, primary colors, mostly red and blue). Of these colors, black and white, widely loved by Koreans since old times, were not appropriate for colors to arouse people's will to modernize their town. Also there is a view that in order to make the "New Village Movement" visually prominent, the ex-President Park might have wanted the roofs to have bright colors, particularly for the houses located along the highways.
    Last edited by stefankarakashev; 09-10-2006 at 03:27 PM.

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    Senior Member stefankarakashev's Avatar
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    Other possible explanations I found in the net:

    "blue roofs... during the Joseon dynasty a blue roof denoted royalty. Now it's just for show."

    ------

    "Bright roofs are certainly popular here in Japan but blue roofs are nearly required in Korea (at one time blue roofs were for nobility only).
    As far as wrong (Chinese) colors on Japanese packaging, it was a constant problem in the joint ventures I worked on for Hitachi. The Chinese colors are red-vs-gold-vs-blue. When Japanese use red on buildings, it is looks like scorched urushi/lacquer red.
    Well that's the first plausible theory I've heard about why roofs are blue. I asked around and nobody could even guess at a theory. My own guess is that the blue was supposed to match the sky, so buildings would be less obtrusive when viewed from the ground. But the typical blue roof is too dark, so that wouldn't explain it either."

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    Default Theory on blue roofs

    My theory on the blue roof phenomenon.

    I just read "China Road". He says in China foreigners are called "ocean people" (literal translation), because that is where they came from when Europeans first arrived and the name stuck. The buildings that are blue appear to be mostly factories, which are of course making goods for foreigner market export. Blue, the color of the ocean, is the new color of prosperity in China, the symbol of China's current economic expansion.

    Stbalbach

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    As part of an effort to modernize Korea, the late President Park Chung Hee enforced the so-called "New Village Movement" (Saemaeul Undong in Korean) in the 1970s, aimed at developing agricultural villages. In 1971, 335 sacks of cement were offered to 33,267 rural towns, and used for transforming the tradition-bound straw-thatched houses [choga-jip] into roofing tiles. So the tile roofs of the most houses were produced during the nearly same period. Thus we can guess that "entire villages came to have new roofs" with certain designated and stereotyped colors. When it comes to colors, we have to take into account the Korean people's color sense in architecture. On the basis of theory of five elements [o-haeng]and yin and yang as well as the traditional Korean colors of obang-saek (five colors of red, blue, yellow, white and black) has been widely used and among those, red and blue have been the main colors. (Think of Korean temples decorated with splendid, primary colors, mostly red and blue). Of these colors, black and white, widely loved by Koreans since old times, were not appropriate for colors to arouse people's will to modernize their town. He says in China foreigners are called "ocean people" (literal translation), because that is where they came from when Europeans first arrived and the name stuck. The buildings that are blue appear to be mostly factories, which are of course making goods for foreigner market export. Blue, the color of the ocean, is the new color of prosperity in China, the symbol of China's current economic expansion.
    Last edited by Appletom; 09-20-2010 at 12:27 PM.

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