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Thread: pacman invades discussion

  1. #1
    Administrator GEHFileBot's Avatar
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    Default pacman invades discussion

    This is a discussion thread for the following file:

    pacman invades

    looks like pacman has invaded yhe USA


  2. #2
    ṨῤἵḋểṙẊƻƻ SpiderX22's Avatar
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    They are just irrigation circles...
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  3. #3
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    Question The Invasion of Pacman

    What, pray tell, is an irrigation circle? What is it's purpose, and why is it significant, or preferable, to other irrigation (squares)?

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    Senior Member shrinkingman's Avatar
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    All is explained here, in these countless other such enquiries.

    http://www.googleearthhacks.com/foru...earchid=263253
    I can only make one person happy per day. Today is not your day. Tomorrow isn't looking good either.

  5. #5
    Senior Member stefankarakashev's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by davjohn
    What, pray tell, is an irrigation circle? What is it's purpose, and why is it significant, or preferable, to other irrigation (squares)?
    Irrigation is the replacement or supplementation of rainfall with water from another source in order to grow crops or plants. In contrast, agriculture that relies only on direct rainfall is sometimes referred to as dryland farming.

    The water source for irrigation may be a nearby or distant body of lake or frozen water such as a river, spring, lake, aquifer, well, or snowpack. Depending on the distance of the source and the seasonality of rainfall, the water may be channelled directly to the agricultural fields or stored in reservoirs or cisterns for later use. In addition, the "harvesting" of local rain that falls on the roofs of buildings or on nearby unfarmed hills and its use to supplement the rain that falls directly on farmed fields also involves irrigation.

    Various types of irrigation techniques differ in how the water obtained from the source is distributed within the field. In general, the goal is to supply the entire field uniformly with water, so that each plant has the amount of water it needs, neither too much nor too little.

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