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Thread: Found Two SR-71 Black birds discussion

  1. #1
    Administrator GEHFileBot's Avatar
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    Default Found Two SR-71 Black birds discussion

    This is a discussion thread for the following file:

    Found Two SR-71 Black birds

    Do we still use these? Or do they belong to NASA.


  2. #2

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    Does anyone know what the gigantic baring marker to the East of the planes is?

  3. #3
    Junior Member trimetrov's Avatar
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    It's a gigantic bearing marker...not to be sarcastic, but you're right-on.

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    Senior Member photizo's Avatar
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    Someone told in another forum that this is one of the space shuttle alternativ airstrips. Perhaps - in case of emergencies - they need this giant compass...

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    From what I've read the Blackbird is no longer in service either by NASA nor the military. Could be wrong though, but think is has happened?

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    This is Edwards AFB, an the brown area in the east is Rogers Dry Lake, the lines which are tangent to the baring marker are in fact a very long runway used for space shuttle landing.

    Concerning the Blackbirds, they look more YF-12 than SR-71 because of ther cropped nose:

    YF-12


    SR-71

  7. #7
    Master Finder McMaster_de's Avatar
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    I think that can not be YF-12 because there are no more under the sky.
    Found this on a site:

    # The first YF-12A (S/N 60-6934) was converted to SR-71C S/N 64-17981
    # The second YF-12A was transferred to the USAF Museum.
    # The third YF-12A crashed on 24 June 1971.
    You search it, I will find it!

  8. #8
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    Ok, I found the same, and I also found:

    3 SR-71A are still operational,
    - 2 for the USAF (N░ 64-17967 and 64-17971)
    - 1 for the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center (N░64-17980)

    And the three are located at Edwards AFB!!!

    But the cropped nose was a particularity of the YF-12.

  9. #9
    Master Finder McMaster_de's Avatar
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    Here are the locations for all Blackbirds:
    60-6924 A-12 Blackbird Airpark, Palmdale, CA (AFFTC Museum)
    60-6925 A-12 Intrepid Sea-Air-Space Museum, NY
    60-6926 A-12 crashed 24 May 1963, CIA pilot ejected safely
    60-6927 A-12 Museum of Science/Industry, LA (Stored at Skunk Works)
    60-6928 A-12 crashed 05 January 1967, CIA pilot killed
    60-6929 A-12 crashed 28 December 1967, pilot ejected safely
    60-6930 A-12 Alabama Space and Rocket Center, Huntsville
    60-6931 A-12 Minnesota ANG Museum, St Paul, MN
    60-6932 A-12 crashed 5 June 1968, CIA pilot killed
    60-6933 A-12 San Diego Aerospace Museum
    60-6934 YF-12A destroyed on landing 14 August 1966
    60-6935 YF-12A USAF Museum, Dayton, OH
    60-6936 YF-12A crashed 24 June 1971, crew ejected safely
    60-6937 A-12 Storage, Plant 42 (Skunk Works)
    60-6938 A-12 USS Alabama Battleship Memorial Park, Mobile, AL
    60-6939 A-12 destroyed on landing 9 July 1964, crew ejected safely
    60-6940 A-12 Museum of Flight, Seattle
    60-6941 M-12 crashed 30 July 1966 , pilot survived, LCO killed
    64-17950 SR-71A destroyed on takeoff 11 April 1969, crew ejected safely
    64-17951 SR-71A Pima Air Museum, Tucson, AZ (NASA YF-12C 937)
    64-17952 SR-71A crashed 25 January 1966, pilot survived, RSO killed
    64-17953 SR-71A crashed 18 December 1969, crew ejected safely
    64-17954 SR-71A destroyed on takeoff 11 April 1969, crew ejected safely
    64-17955 SR-71A AFFTC Museum, Edwards AFB, CA
    64-17956 SR-71B Operational, NASA Dryden FRC, Edwards AFB, CA
    64-17957 SR-71B crashed 11 January 1968, crew ejected safely
    64-17958 SR-71A Robbins AFB Museum, GA
    64-17959 SR-71A Air Force Armament Museum, Eglin AFB, FL
    64-17960 SR-71A Castle Air Museum, Merced, CA
    64-17961 SR-71A Kansas Cosmosphere & Space Center, Hutchinson, KS
    64-17962 SR-71A Reserve Fleet, Plant 42, Palmdale, CA
    64-17963 SR-71A Beale AFB Museum, CA
    64-17964 SR-71A SAC Museum, Offut AFB, NE
    64-17965 SR-71A crashed 25 October 1967, crew ejected safely
    64-17966 SR-71A crashed 13 April 1967, crew ejected safely
    64-17967 SR-71A Operational (USAF), Det 2, 9th SW, Edwards AFB, CA
    64-17968 SR-71A Reserve Fleet, Plant 42, Palmdale, CA
    64-17969 SR-71A crashed 10 May 1970, crew ejected safely
    64-17970 SR-71A crashed 17 June 1970, crew ejected safely
    64-17971 SR-71A Operational (USAF), Det 2, 9th SW, Edwards AFB, CA
    64-17972 SR-71A National Air and Space Museum, Washington D.C.
    64-17973 SR-71A Blackbird Airpark, Palmdale, CA (Det 1 ASC)
    64-17974 SR-71A crashed 21 April 1989, crew ejected safely
    64-17975 SR-71A March Field Museum, March AFB, CA
    64-17976 SR-71A USAF Museum, Dayton, OH
    64-17977 SR-71A destroyed in takeoff accident 10 October 1968
    64-17978 SR-71A destroyed in landing accident 20 July 1972
    64-17979 SR-71A History & Traditions Museum, Lackland AFB, TX
    64-17980 SR-71A Operational, NASA Dryden FRC, Edwards AFB, CA
    64-17981 SR-71C Hill AFB Museum, Hill AFB, UT
    You search it, I will find it!

  10. #10
    Master Finder McMaster_de's Avatar
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    Maybe they have removed the nose for inspection. Because this will be one of the hottest areas during flight.
    You search it, I will find it!

  11. #11
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    You missed the one at the Evergreen Air Musuem in Mcminnville, Oregon. I'm not sure what the number is on it. I just know that it's one of the birds that my dad worked on.

  12. #12
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    There is still one more at the Huntsville Space Station, In AL. Dont know the number but it was retired in 1990.

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