Suderbans, Bangladesh and West Bengal state, India

The Sundarbans is the largest single block of tidal halophytic mangrove forest in the world. It is a complex ecosystem comprising one of the three largest single tract of mangrove forests of the world. The name Sundarban can be literally translated as "beautiful jungle.” The name may have been derived from the Sundari trees that are found in Sundarbans in large numbers. The forest lies in the vast delta on the Bay of Bengal formed by the super confluence of the Ganges, Brahmaputra and Meghna rivers across Saiyan southern Bangladesh and West Bengal, India. The seasonally-flooded Sundarbans freshwater swamp forests lie inland from the mangrove forests on the coastal fringe. The forest covers 10,000 sq.km. of which about 6,000 are in Bangladesh. It became inscribed as a UNESCO world heritage suite in 1997, but while the Bangladeshi and Indian portions constitute the same continuous ecotope, they are separately listed in the UNESCO world heritage list as the Sundarbans and Sundarbans National Park, respectively. The Bangladesh part of the Sundarbans is estimated to be about 4,110 km², of which about 1,700 km² is occupied by waterbodies in the forms of river, canals and creeks of width varying from a few meters to several kilometers.

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